The Final Bell

Should we pass kids just for sitting in a chair? What does it means to be a real teacher in a data-driven world? I think we must learn how to reach and support kids in spite of the data addiction currently gripping, choking, American education, an addiction, which if we are not careful, can lead us to put the grade before the kid.

What is the mythical point of contact between the idea of fully supporting a kid and the idea of honestly assessing them? Assessment has always confused all of us most of the time – it is so arbitrary.

In some teachers, assessment actually overtakes the classroom, and no real teaching occurs. That is a dark thing. It is why so many like Tolstoy and others couldn’t deal with school, seeing it as endless drudgery filled with mindless boring tasks, to paraphrase the great Russian master.

When in February I sign a paper allowing a failing student to register for French II at the high school, I do so in order to keep the plant alive. If the plant dies,a simple email to the high school in May if the plant shows it has died straightens things out. But this rarely happens, because I water the plant.

Those who refuse to sign the sign up slip for next year in the interests of “just being honest with the kid” forget that they are doing it in the middle of the year. Why do that? The year is only half over. My job is to teach the kid and not the curriculum all year long. My job is to teach kids French in that order. My job is to do all I can to give these kids an experience of what it feels like to succeed. I know I am not alone.

I don’t care a fig about analyzing the student and all of that stuff. I can’t control any of that. I can only control the teacher part. I can only control what I do in my classroom. I succeed or fail in teaching my students to the degree that I am able to open up my heart, not my head, to the kids, and to support them as people first and students second, as precious jewels and not data bots.

I can only keep loving and supporting each and every last pierced gothic freak and superstar soccer player no matter what, all the way up to that final assessment when I REALLY find out how much they have learned, which is when I finalize what level they should be in. 

Any discussion about assessment brings up a great opportunity to remind each other on this list about the related point of what Blaine says about weighing pigs – you can’t make those porkers grow any faster by weighing them more often.

So, why don’t we just actually DO CPI during the weeks and months leading up to the final end of year assessments, seriously minimizing tests, and then letting those big bad boys – the end of year common and district assessments – naturally select out who should go to the next level, à la Ted Sizer? If we do massive slow CPI now in February, we won’t have to do frenetic CPR later. I apologize for that bad pun. No I don’t.

We need to remember in this discussion that if a kid is doing their best imitation of a potted plant in our classes, that there are reasons for that: stuff going on at home, being only fifteen years old in present day America (I am still scared and I have been here a lot longer than that), not connecting with the drudgery of school, etc.

We can’t play the failing card on them in February! That’s all they need – another reason to not want to get out of bed in the morning,in the harsh light of winter yet, another class to cross off, another adult to mistrust, another room to become a plant in.

When we fail them by not signing their forms for the next level, we become sheep eating flowers arbitrarily. But sheep do such things out of ignorance and we have no such excuse. That is why I sign those forms waiting for that end of year assessment to make the decision about next year’s level for me. To keep the plant alive as long as possible, by never taking anything they do or say or fail to do for me personally.

So I am just going to continue to place my focus more and more and still yet more on loving and supporting kids even if they have gnarly snarkification assessmentos zits.  We love and support kids, and we don’t get into the details.

After all, we have TPRS to do help us do that, and so we are WAY AHEAD of the game. We are in a ball park that many teachers don’t even know exists, bless their hearts.

So let us not waste our time getting into arguments about defining assessment and passing and failing and input and output and all that. We have our end of year exams to decide those things for us. How dare we focus on anything else but the student? How dare we forget our real callings as teachers, to help kids become (not necessarily fluent in French) but better human beings.

I will not apologize for the self esteem movement, nor on the other hand will I lie to kids about grades. But I sure as hell will make my tests easy during the year so that they can experience some success and want to pay attention in my classroom.

Then, deftly holding off until June, only then will I nudge them gently and with loving kindness away from the next level of study if the testing gods so decree. Of course there is a place for tests, but to me during the year they should be just easy little things.

Teachers who have already written kids off now in February because they are assessment nazis deserve the loud snoring and springtime desk drooling of the kids they have written off when they refuse to support those kids all the way up to the final bell.

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One Response to “The Final Bell”

  1. Rachel Anne Brimer Says:

    I am cheering OUTLOUD reading this!! Ben this is SO my heart for the kids. I teach my students, not my subject, first. I am so glad to have a kindred spirit out there. It is so encouraging to know that you are there with me in spirit and that I am not crazy. When they engage and when they just peek out for a minute and respond I am excited. They are not taught to engage in any other classroom but mine, it feels. They are still learning to trust me.

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